COMPARATIVE LITERATURE AND FOREIGN LANGUAGES

Faculty
About the Programs | Undergraduate Curriculum
The UC Tri-Campus Graduate Program in Classics

Thomas F. Scanlon, Ph.D., Chair
Department Office, 2402 Humanities
 and Social Sciences; (909) 787-5007
complitforlang.ucr.edu

Faculty E-mails

Professors
David K. Danow, Ph.D. Russian and Comparative Literature
Reinhold Grimm, Ph.D. Comparative Literature and Germanic Studies
Georg M. Gugelberger, Ph.D. Comparative Literature
Stephanie B. Hammer, Ph.D. Comparative Literature and Germanic Studies
Lisa A. Raphals, Ph.D. Chinese and Comparative Ancient Civilizations
Thomas F. Scanlon, Ph.D. Classics and Comparative Ancient Civilizations
George E. Slusser, Ph.D. Comparative Literature
Yenna Wu, Ph.D. Asian Languages and Civilizations
Professors Emeriti
Anastasius C. Bandy, Ph.D. Classics
Sam J. Borg, Ph.D. French
Donald G. Daviau, Ph.D. Germanic Studies
Henry W. Decker, Ph.D. French
Robert B. Griffin, Ph.D. Comparative Literature and French
Jules F. Levin, Ph.D. Linguistics and Russian
Keith H. Macfarlane, Ph.D. French
Eliud Martínez, Ph.D. Comparative Literature (Comparative Literature and Foreign Languages/Creative Writing)
Louis A. Pedrotti, Ph.D. Russian
Josef Purkart, Ph.D. Germanic Studies
Lubomir Radoyce, M.A. Comparative Literature and Russian
Guenther C. Rimbach, Ph.D. Germanic Studies
Ben F. Stoltzfus, Ph.D., Litt.D. Comparative Literature and French (Comparative Literature and Foreign Languages/Creative Writing)
Associate Professors
Theda Shapiro, Ph.D. French
Yang Ye, Ph.D. Asian Languages and Civilizations
Assistant Professors
Michelle E. Bloom, Ph.D. Comparative Literature and French
Christopher Bolton, Ph.D. Japanese
••
Visiting Assistant Professor
Simone Yeomans, Ph.D. Germanic Studies
Lecturers
Jingsong Chen, Ph.D. Chinese
Christine Duverge, M.A., French
Yoshiko T. Hain, M.A. Japanese
Benjamin King, Ph.D. Classics
Namhee Lee, M.A. Korean
Nicoletta Tinozzi Mehrmand, Ph.D. Italian
Valerie Morgan, M.A. French
Sylvia Ochs, M.A. Germanic Studies
Wendy J. Raschke, Ph.D. Classics/Comparative Ancient Civilizations
Kelle Truby, Ph.D. French
Heidi Waltz, Ph.D. Linguistics/Germanic Studies
Helen Xu, M.A. Chinese
Ekaterina Yudina, Ph.D. Russian

MAJORS

The Department of Comparative Literature and Foreign Languages offers courses and degree programs in Western and non-Western national literatures, languages, and civilizations. It also has programs in Comparative Literature (including World Literature), in Comparative Ancient Civilizations, and in Linguistics. Its programs encourage a wide variety of both disciplinary and interdisciplinary interests. The department believes in the importance of offering fundamental training in the humanities in their own literary and linguistic contexts as well as in their cultural and interdisciplinary dimensions. Accordingly, students may obtain degrees or take courses in a specialized field, while at the same time enhancing the breadth of their education within and outside of the department.

Some subject areas, such as Chinese, Classical Studies, French, Germanic Studies, and Russian Studies, offer both a major and a minor. Others do not currently have a major, but a minor is available, as in Italian Studies and Japanese.

The department offers the following majors leading to the B.A. degree.

Chinese

The B.A. in Chinese is for the student interested in the study of the Chinese language and Chinese culture or literature.

Classical Studies

The B.A. in Classical Studies combines the study of Greek and/or Latin language and literature with courses which explore the historical, philosophical, political, and cultural developments of Greece and Rome and their impact on Western civilization.

Comparative Ancient Civilizations

For the B.A. in Comparative Ancient Civilizations, students employ the methods of humanities and social sciences in the comparison study of several major cultures of the past. They acquire skills of historical and social analysis, multicultural awareness, and insight into constructions of civilizations in general.

Comparative Literature

The department offers the B.A. degree in Comparative Literature and the M.A. and Ph.D. graduate degrees.

While students majoring in Comparative Literature must have a knowledge of the languages involved in the literatures of their choice, Comparative Literature courses themselves are open to all students. All work is done in translation and the courses are given in English. Students take both Comparative Literature and World Literature courses for the major. World Literature courses do not comprise a degree program; the topics are more general than those in Comparative Literature and include a whole range of interdisciplinary studies on the interrelations of literature.

French, Germanic Studies, and Russian Studies

The B.A. degree is offered in French, Germanic Studies, and Russian Studies. Students interested in pursuing graduate studies in areas not offering the M.A. or Ph.D. may do so through the graduate program in Comparative Literature. Requirements for degrees include proficiency in the language of the literature. (a) The Literature Option is available for majors in French (b) The Civilization Option is available for majors in French. Civilization studies are concerned with the culture of the language or literature of a student's focus, and with the people of the country where that language or literature exists or existed. Specific requirements for the various civilization options are listed under French.

Language

The Language Major allows a student to specialize in two or three foreign languages through a knowledge not only of the languages themselves but also of the bases of language (linguistics), examples of their creative use (literature), and the cultures which they reflect (civilization).

Linguistics

A B.A. in Linguistics is available through a program administered by an interdepartmental committee. Some foreign language study is essential for specialization in this discipline, as well as the pursuit of research projects and other kinds of practical work in linguistic-related areas.

Other Course Work

The department also offers course work in Asian literature, Chinese (language, literature, and culture), Civilization, Italian (language and literature), Japanese (language, literature, and culture), Korean (language), and World Literature. Doctoral studies in French and Germanic Studies are available through Comparative Literature.

Graduate Degrees

Comparative Literature (interliterary) M.A.
Comparative Literature (interliterary or interdisciplinary) Ph.D.
UC Tri-Campus Graduate Program in Classics M.A. and Ph.D.

Teaching Assistantships and Fellowships

Teaching assistantships and fellowships are available. Teaching assistants are normally held for LTLG 301 (Teaching of Foreign Language at the College Level). Course work and/or teaching experience at another college-level institution may be accepted in fulfillment of this requirement.

Teaching Credential Waivers

Details and counseling on the Bridge to Teaching Program, a waiver program for the multiple subjects teaching credential, are available in the Liberal Studies and Interdisciplinary Programs office, (909) 787-2742. Details and counseling on other waiver programs are available in the Graduate School of Education.

Education Abroad Program

The Comparative Literature and Foreign Languages department encourages eligible students to participate in the Education Abroad Program (EAP). The EAP is an excellent opportunity to become deeply familiar with another country and its culture while earning academic units towards graduation. In addition to year-long programs, a wide range of shorter options is available. While on EAP, students are still eligible for financial assistance. Students are advised to plan study abroad well in advance to ensure that the courses taken fit with their overall program at UCR. Consult the departmental student affairs officer for assistance. For further details see the University of California's EAP Web site at www.uoeap.ucsb.eduor contact UCR's International Services Center at (909) 787-4113. For advice consult the departmental student affairs officer or Professor Shapiro.

See Education Abroad Program under International Services Center in the Student Services section of this catalog. A list of participating countries is found under Education Abroad Program in the Curricula and Courses section.

Degree Requirements

University Requirements

See the Undergraduate Studies section for requirements that all students must satisfy.

College Requirements

See Degree Requirements, College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences, in the Undergraduate Studies Section, for requirements that students must satisfy.

Major Requirements

Requirements for the majors and courses offered are described in the sections that follow.

Asian Languages and Civilizations
Chinese (Mandarin) Japanese Korean
Civilization
Classical Studies
Classics Greek Latin
Comparative Studies
Comparative Ancient Civilizations Comparative and World Literature
Foreign Languages, Language, and Linguistics
French Germanic Studies Italian Russian Studies Language Literatures and Languages Linguistics


ASIAN LANGUAGES AND CIVILIZATIONS

Committee in Charge

Christopher Bolton, Ph.D. Japanese
Jingsong Chen, Ph.D. Chinese
Yoshiko T. Hain, M.A. Japanese
Namhee Lee, M.A. Korean
Lisa Raphals, Ph.D. Chinese and Comparative Ancient Civilizations
Yenna Wu, Ph.D. Asian Languages and Civilizations
Helen Xu, M.A. Chinese
Yang Ye, Ph.D. Asian Languages and Civilizations
Patricia O'Brien, Ph.D. Dean, College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences, ex officio


CHINESE (MANDARIN)

Subject abbreviation: CHN


Students are encouraged to consider opportunities for study in China or Taiwan through the Education Abroad Program (EAP). This is an excellent opportunity to become deeply familiar with another country and its culture while earning academic units towards graduation. In addition to year-long programs, a wide range of shorter options is available. While on EAP, students are still eligible for financial assistance. Students are advised to plan study abroad well in advance to ensure that the courses taken fit with their overall program at UCR. For further details see the University of California's EAP Web site, at www.uoeap.ucsb.edu or contact UCR's International Services Center at (909) 787-4113.

See Education Abroad Program under International Services Center in the Student Services section of this catalog. A list of participating countries is found under Education Abroad Program in the Curricula and Courses section.

MAJOR

The Chinese major is for students interested in the study of the Chinese language and Chinese culture or literature. Students should consult their advisors to design a set of courses on one of the following tracks. Track A is for students who may wish to pursue graduate studies in the field. Track B is for students who may want to approach Chinese culture and civilization in greater breadth.

Foreign Language Placement Examination A placement examination is required of all freshmen entering the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences who wish to meet the foreign language requirement with the same language taken in high school. Consult the quarterly Schedule of Classes for date and time. Transfer students who have taken college-level language courses cannot take the examination and should consult with their advisors. No college-level credit may be duplicated.

Track A: Chinese Language and Literature

Students who major in Track A are expected to have completed their third-year level of Chinese (CHN 101 series) or else to demonstrate equivalent proficiency. Proficiency can be demonstrated by placement examination, by challenging and testing out of CHN 101 series, or by successful completion of CHN 105, CHN 108, CHN 110 (E-Z), or CHN 115 (E-Z). Students also complete a minimum of 44 units, distributed under the following three categories:

  1. Twenty (20) units of upper-division courses in Chinese language, taught in Chinese:  CHN 105, CHN 108, CHN 110 (E-Z)* (students may take more than one segment), CHN 115 (E-Z)* (students may take more than one segment)
  2. Sixteen (16) units of upper-division literature courses drawn from the following (students may take more than one segment of courses with (E-Z) designation):  CHN 104, CHN 110 (E-Z)* (students may take more than one segment), CHN 115 (E-Z)* (students may take more than one segment), CHN 130A/AST 130A, CHN 130B/AST 130B, CHN 135/AST 135, CHN 136/AST 136, CHN 142/RLST 142/ AST 142**, CHN 148/AST 148, CHN 185/AST 185, CHN 190 (may be repeated on different topics)
  3. Eight (8) units drawn from the following list, or any other course related to China, with advisor's consent: AHS 140/AST 140, AHS 141/AST 141, AHS 143/AST 143, AST 142/CHN 142/ RLST 142**, CPLT 144/RLST 144HIST 180, HIST 181, HIST 182, RLST 103

Track B: Chinese Language and Culture

Students who major in Track B are expected to have completed the third-year level of Chinese (CHN 101 series) or else to demonstrate equivalent proficiency. Proficiency can be demonstrated by placement examination, by challenging and testing out of CHN 101 series, or by successful completion of CHN 105, CHN 108, CHN 110 (E-Z), or CHN 115 (E-Z). Students also complete a total number of 48 units, distributed under the following two categories:

  1. Twenty (20) units of upper-division courses in Chinese language, taught in Chinese: CHN 105, CHN 108, CHN 110 (E-Z)* (students may take more than one segment), CHN 115 (E-Z)* (students may take more than one segment)
  2. Culture and Civilization requirement: Twenty-eight (28) units of upper-division courses from the following courses, or any other course related to China, with advisor's consent: 
    AHS 140/AST 140, AHS 141/AST 141, AHS 143/AST 143
    CHN 104, CHN 110 (E-Z)* (students may take more than one segment), CHN 115 (E-Z)* (students may take more than one segment), CHN 130A/AST 130A, CHN 130B/AST 130B, CHN 135/AST 135, CHN 136/AST 136, CHN 142/RLST 142/ AST 142**, CHN 148/AST 148, CHN 185/AST 185, CHN 190 (may be repeated on different topics)
    CPLT 144/RLST 144HIST 180, HIST 181, HIST 182, RLST 103
    * These courses may be used to fulfill the requirements under either category (a) or category (b), but not both.
    ** This course may be used to fulfill requirements under either category (b) or category (c), but not both.

Minor

The Chinese minor provides students the opportunity to complement their majors in different areas, such as Anthropology, Art History, Dance, Economics, History, Liberal Studies, Political Science, Religious Studies, etc., with basic communication skills and understanding of Chinese language and culture.

Students are expected to have completed the third-year level of Chinese (CHN 101 series) or else to demonstrate equivalent proficiency. Proficiency can be demonstrated by placement examination, by challenging and testing out of CHN 101 series, or by successful completion of CHN 105, CHN 108, CHN 110 (E-Z), or CHN 115 (E-Z). Students also complete a total number of 16 upper-division units, distributed as follows:

  1. Eight (8) units drawn from the following courses: CHN 105, CHN 108, CHN 110 (E-Z), or CHN 115 (E-Z) (Students may take more than one segment)
  2. Eight (8) units drawn from the following courses, or any other course related to China, with advisor's consent:

See Minors under the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences in the Undergraduate Studies section of this catalog for additional information on minors.


LOWER-DIVISION COURSES

CHN 001. First-Year Chinese. (4) Lecture, four hours. Prerequisite(s): none. An introduction to the sound system and grammar of Chinese, with attention to the development of the four skills: understanding, speaking, reading and writing. Classes conducted in Chinese insofar as possible. Audio-lingual learning materials available in the language laboratory.

CHN 002. First-Year Chinese. (4) Lecture, four hours. Prerequisite(s): CHN 001 or equivalent. An introduction to the sound system and grammar of Chinese, with attention to the development of the four skills: understanding, speaking, reading and writing. Classes conducted in Chinese insofar as possible. Audio-lingual learning materials available in the language laboratory.

CHN 003. First-Year Chinese. (4) Lecture, four hours. Prerequisite(s): CHN 002 or equivalent. An introduction to the sound system and grammar of Chinese, with attention to the development of the four skills: understanding, speaking, reading and writing. Classes conducted in Chinese insofar as possible. Audio-lingual learning materials available in the language laboratory.

CHN 004. Second-Year Chinese. (4) Lecture, four hours. Prerequisite(s): CHN 003 or equivalent. Covers reading, listening, speaking, and writing. Lectures are conducted primarily in Putonghua (Mandarin) and when necessary in English. The textbooks are in the standardized simplified characters.

CHN 005. Second-Year Chinese. (4) Lecture, four hours. Prerequisite(s): CHN 004 or equivalent. Covers reading, listening, speaking, and writing. Lectures are conducted primarily in Putonghua (Mandarin) and when necessary in English. The textbooks are in the standardized simplified characters.

CHN 006. Second-Year Chinese. (4) Lecture, four hours. Prerequisite(s): CHN 005 or equivalent. Covers reading, listening, speaking, and writing. Lectures are conducted primarily in Putonghua (Mandarin) and when necessary in English. The textbooks are in the standardized simplified characters.

CHN 025. Conversation and Composition. (4) Lecture, three hours; extra reading, three hours. Prerequisite(s): CHN 003 or equivalent. Practice at the intermediate level in speaking and writing Chinese. Regular discussion and oral presentation of assigned written topics. A review of basic grammar with an aim to active oral and written command. Chen

CHN 030. Introduction to Chinese Civilization. (4) Lecture, two hours; discussion, one hour; extra reading, three hours. Prerequisite(s): none. An introduction to Chinese civilization through an interplay of philosophical, historical, religious, and literary readings from the ancient times through the modern age. Audiovisual media is used. All work is done in English. Cross-listed with AST 030. Ye

CHN 040. Masterworks of Chinese Literature. (4) Lecture, three hours; outside research, three hours. Prerequisite(s): none. Reading and discussion of selected great works of Chinese literature (in English translation) with attention to cultural contexts. Various critical methods and approaches are used. Cross-listed with AST 040. Ye

CHN 048. Chinese Cinema. (4) Lecture, two hours; discussion, one hour; screening, two hours; outside research, one hour. Prerequisite(s): none. Study of selected films from China and Taiwan with attention to cultural context. Questions addressed may include the following: What do we look for in a film? What are the film's interrelations with theatre, photography, and literature? How do we understand the film as an art form? Cross-listed with AST 048. Ye

CHN 090. Special Studies. (1-5) Individual study, three to fifteen hours. To be taken with the consent of the Chair of the Department as means of meeting special curricular problems in either language or literature. Course is repeatable.


UPPER-DIVISION COURSES

CHN 101A. Third-Year Chinese. (4) Lecture, three hours; individual study, three hours. Prerequisite(s): CHN 006 or equivalent or consent of instructor. A continuation of studies in the modern Chinese vernacular. Explores textbook readings and different styles of writing derived from newspaper columns, Marvel comics, and short stories. Involves frequent exercises in English-Chinese translation and free composition.

CHN 101B. Third-Year Chinese. (4) Lecture, three hours; individual study, three hours. Prerequisite(s): CHN 101A or equivalent or consent of instructor. A continuation of studies in the modern Chinese vernacular. Explores textbook readings and different styles of writing derived from newspaper columns, Marvel comics, and short stories. Involves frequent exercises in English-Chinese translation and free composition.

CHN 101C. Third-Year Chinese. (4) Lecture, three hours; individual study, three hours. Prerequisite(s): CHN 101B or equivalent or consent of instructor. A continuation of studies in the modern Chinese vernacular. Besides textbook readings, different styles of writing derived from newspaper columns, Marvel comics, and short stories are explored. Frequent exercises in English-Chinese translation and free composition.

CHN 104. Introduction to Classical Chinese Texts. (4) Lecture, three hours; consultation, one hour. Prerequisite(s): CHN 003 or equivalent or consent of instructor. Introduction to classical Chinese philosophical and historical texts. Readings of primary source materials and analysis of grammar and usage. Class is conducted in English.

CHN 105. Classical Chinese Prose. (4) Lecture, three hours; term paper, three hours. Prerequisite(s): CHN 006 or equivalent. Close reading of selected texts from the Han and pre-Han period, chosen to illustrate the main features of the Chinese Ku-wen (classical prose). Ye

CHN 107. Taoist Traditions. (4) Lecture, three hours; individual study, three hours. Prerequisite(s): AST 030/CHN 030 or upper-division standing or consent of instructor. A survey of the ancient mystical and philosophical aspects of Taoism as well as the living religious tradition, their relationships to each other, and their expression in Chinese culture and civilization. Topics include the Tao Te Ching, the Chuang-tzu, the Taoist canon, meditation, immortality, alchemy, and ritual. Cross-listed with AST 107 and RLST 107. Raphals

CHN 108. Introduction to Classical Chinese Poetry. (4) Lecture, three hours; extra reading, three hours. Prerequisite(s): CHN 101C or equivalent or consent of instructor. Reading and explication of representative texts in various genres and forms, chosen to illustrate the development of classical Chinese poetry from its origin through the premodern age. Classes are conducted primarily in Chinese. Ye

CHN 110 (E-Z). Readings in Twentieth-Century Chinese Literature. (4) Lecture, three hours; extra reading, three hours. Prerequisite(s): CHN 101C or equivalent or consent of instructor. Representative works of major authors. Readings and discussions are conducted in Chinese. E. Contemporary Chinese Fiction; M. Modern Chinese Fiction; S. Modern Chinese Poetry; W. Modern Chinese Prose. Wu, Ye

CHN 115 (E-Z). Readings in Thirteenth- to Nineteenth-Century Chinese Literature. (4) Lecture, three hours; extra reading, three hours. Prerequisite(s): CHN 101C or equivalent or consent of instructor. Vernacular literature from the Yuan to the Qing dynasties. Readings and discussions are conducted in Chinese. G. Honglou meng; M. Ming Novel; Q. Qing Novel; S. The Short Story; Y. Yuan Drama. Wu

CHN 130A. Chinese Literature in Translation. (4) Lecture, three hours; term paper, three hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Knowledge of Chinese not required. Involves lectures and collateral reading of representative works in English and translation. Covers poetry, historical records, essays, drama, and fiction from Earliest Times to the Yuan Dynasty (1368 A.D.). Can be taken out of sequence. Cross-listed with AST 130A. Wu, Ye

CHN 130B. Chinese Literature in Translation. (4) Lecture, three hours; term paper, three hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Knowledge of Chinese not required. Involves lectures and collateral reading of representative works in English and translation. Covers drama and fiction from the fourteenth century to the end of the Qing Dynasty (1911 A.D.). Can be taken out of sequence. Cross-listed with AST 130B. Wu, Ye

CHN 135. Great Novels of China. (4) Lecture, three hours; extra reading, three hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Examines the social, philosophical, and aesthetic features in major Ming-Qing novels through critical reading and analysis of literature in translation. No knowledge of Chinese required. Cross-listed with AST 135. Wu

CHN 136. Family and Gender in the Chinese Short Story. (4) Lecture, three hours; extra reading, three hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Examines a broad array of short stories from the Tang to the Qing dynasties (approximately ninth to eighteenth century). Investigates love, marriage, family, gender dynamics, and the representation of women in Chinese literature. No knowledge of Chinese required. Cross-listed with AST 136. Wu

CHN 142. Chuang-tzu. (4) Lecture, one hour; discussion, two hours; outside research, one hour; extra reading, one hour; term paper, one hour. Prerequisite(s): RLST 005 or RLST 005H or AST 107/CHN 107/RLST 107 or consent of instructor. An examination of chaos, epistemological and linguistic relativism, fate, skill, and the character of the sage in perhaps the most significant of Chinese Taoist texts, the Chuang-tzu. Discussion of the structure and style of this literary masterpiece. Students with knowledge of classical Chinese may arrange additional work through special studies. Cross-listed with AST 142 and RLST 142. Nyitray

CHN 148. Chinese Poetry and Poetics in Translation. (4) Lecture, two hours; discussion, one hour; extra reading, three hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Examination of traditional Chinese poetry through the study of selected major texts, emphasizing forms, themes, and Chinese poetics in its close relation to the development of Chinese literature. Classes are conducted in English. Cross-listed with AST 148. Ye

CHN 185. New Chinese Cinema. (4) Lecture, two hours; discussion, one hour; screening, two hours; extra reading, one hour. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. A study of representative films from the People's Republic of China, with a focus on those made during the last decade. Conducted in English; films to be shown from videocassettes are mostly with English subtitles. Cross-listed with AST 185. Ye

CHN 190. Special Studies. (1-5) Individual study, three to fifteen hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. To be taken with the consent of the Chair of the Department as a means of meeting special curricular problems in either language or literature. Course is repeatable.

CHN 195. Senior Thesis. (2-4) Thesis, six to twelve hours. Prerequisite(s): senior standing; consent of instructor. Individual research and preparation of a thesis completed under the supervision of a faculty member. Course is repeatable to a maximum of 12 units.


JAPANESE

Subject abbreviation: JPN


The Japanese Minor allows students to combine offerings from different fields and departments to pursue systematically the study of Japanese language and culture.

Students are encouraged to consider opportunities for study in Japan through the Education Abroad Program (EAP). This is an excellent opportunity to become deeply familiar with another country and its culture while earning academic units towards graduation. In addition to year-long programs, a wide range of shorter options is available. While on EAP, students are still eligible for financial assistance. Students are advised to plan study abroad well in advance to ensure that the courses taken fit with their overall program at UCR. Consult the departmental student affairs officer for assistance. For further details see the University of California's EAP Web site at www.uoeap.ucsb.edu or contact UCR's International Services Center at (909) 787-4113.

See Education Abroad Program under International Services Center in the Student Services section of this catalog. A list of participating countries is found under Education Abroad Program in the Curricula and Courses section.

Enroll in a concentrated beginning or intermediate study program at Fukuyama University, located near Hiroshima. Students may earn a year's worth of university language credit in one month. Contact Karen

Diamond at International Education Programs for further information: (909) 787-4346.

Foreign Language Placement Examination A placement examination is required of all freshmen entering the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences who wish to meet the foreign language requirement with the same language taken in high school. Consult the quarterly Schedule of Classes for date and time. Transfer students who have taken a college-level language course cannot take the placement examination and should consult with their advisors. No college-level credit may be duplicated.

Minor

The minor in Japanese requires the completion of 24 units as follows:

  1. JPN 101A, JPN 101B, JPN 101C (12 units)
  2. Upper-division course work focusing primarily on Japan and its culture (8 units). Courses that meet this requirement include the following. Other appropriate courses may be counted with the advisor's consent.
  1. Additional upper-division course work (4 units) This work may deal with Japan alone, and can be chosen from the list above. Alternatively, the student may, in consultation with the advisor, choose a course that treats Japan in connection with other cultures such as China, America, or Southeast Asia. The courses below have included significant Japan-related content in past years; these or other appropriate courses may be counted toward this requirement with the advisor's approval.

Students may also wish investigate other courses in these departments, as well as courses in Anthropology, Economics, Sociology, World Literature, and other areas.

See Minors under the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences in the Undergraduate Studies section of this catalog for additional information on minors.


LOWER-DIVISION COURSES

JPN 001. First-Year Japanese. (4) Lecture, four hours. Prerequisite(s): none. An introduction to the sound system and grammar of Japanese with emphasis on speaking, reading, writing, and understanding. Classes conducted in Japanese insofar as possible.

JPN 002. First-Year Japanese. (4) Lecture, four hours. Prerequisite(s): JPN 001 or equivalent. An introduction to the sound system and grammar of Japanese with emphasis on speaking, reading, writing, and understanding. Classes conducted in Japanese insofar as possible.

JPN 003. First-Year Japanese. (4) Lecture, four hours. Prerequisite(s): JPN 002 or equivalent. An introduction to the sound system and grammar of Japanese with emphasis on speaking, reading, writing, and understanding. Classes conducted in Japanese insofar as possible.

JPN 004. Second-Year Japanese. (4) Lecture, four hours. Prerequisite(s): JPN 003 or equivalent. Introduces levels of speech and emphasizes reading and writing of advanced prose.

JPN 005. Second-Year Japanese. (4) Lecture, four hours. Prerequisite(s): JPN 004 or equivalent. Concentrates on advanced speech levels and their cultural underpinnings.

JPN 006. Second-Year Japanese. (4) Lecture, four hours. Prerequisite(s): JPN 005 or equivalent. Emphasizes the academic style of written and spoken Japanese and academic comprehension of the cultural background.

JPN 022. Introduction to Japanese Film. (4) Lecture, three hours; screening, three hours. Prerequisite(s): none. An introduction to Japan's major directors and to watching and writing about Japanese film. Works studied range from the samurai epics of Kurosawa to recent anime. All films have subtitles. No previous knowledge of Japanese language or culture is required. Cross-listed with AST 022, FVC 022, and WRLT 022.

JPN 034. Early Japanese Civilization. (4) Lecture, three hours; term paper, three hours. Prerequisite(s): none. An introduction to Japanese civilization from earliest times to the dawn of the twentieth century. Devotes particular attention to aesthetic activity and to the relationship between history, culture, and the arts. Cross-listed with AST 034.

JPN 035. Modern Japanese Society. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite(s): none. An introduction to Japanese culture and society with emphasis on the day-to-day lives of the modern Japanese people at home, work, and play.

JPN 090. Special Studies. (1-5) Individual study, three to fifteen hours. To be taken with the consent of the Chair of the Department as a means of meeting special curricular problems in either language or literature. Course is repeatable.


UPPER-DIVISION COURSES

JPN 101A. Third-Year Japanese. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite(s): JPN 006. Designed to develop students' reading, writing, and speaking abilities in Japanese. The course is conducted in Japanese.

JPN 101B. Third-Year Japanese. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite(s): JPN 101A. Designed to develop students' reading, writing, and speaking abilities in Japanese. The course is conducted in Japanese.

JPN 101C. Third-Year Japanese. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite(s): JPN 101B. Designed to develop students' reading, writing, and speaking abilities in Japanese. The course is conducted in Japanese.

JPN 142. Modern Japanese Literature. (4) Lecture, four hours. Prerequisite(s):upper-division standing or consent of instructor. The course covers major works of modern and contemporary Japanese literature in translation. Bolton

JPN 150. In Women's Hands: Reading Japanese Women Writers. (4) Lecture, three hours; term paper, three hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Examines major works of Japanese women writers from Heian (ninth century) to contemporary, focusing on themes, genres, representations of gender, ideas of love and romance, and feminine aesthetics. Readings include fiction, poetry, essays, and drama, with the main emphasis on fictional writing. Classes are conducted in English.

JPN 151. Early Japanese Literature. (4) Lecture, two hours; discussion, one hour; term paper, three hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. An in-depth introduction to early Japanese literature. Focuses on fiction, from early poem tales and court romances to warrior tales and stories of the floating world. Careful attention is given to the works' historical and cultural backgrounds and visual and artistic dimensions. All works are read in English translation. Cross-listed with AST 151.

JPN 152 (E-Z). Themes in Modern Japanese Literature. (4) Lecture, two hours; discussion, one hour; term paper, three hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. An introduction to modern Japanese literature in translation, as seen through the lens of a particular theme or issue. All materials read or viewed in English. E. The End of the World in Japanese Literature; F. The Mask in Japanese Fiction; G. Love and Death; J. Classics and Canon; K. Dreams and Other Virtual Worlds. Cross-listed with AST 152 (E-Z).

JPN 184. Japanese Film and Visual Culture. (4) Lecture, two hours; discussion, one hour; term paper, three hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Investigates popular visual culture in Japan primarily through film, from the early masters to contemporary directors. Additional material may be drawn from fields such as theatre, television, visual art, architecture, and illustrated fiction. All materials read or viewed in English. Course is repeatable to a maximum of 12 units. Cross-listed with AST 184, CPLT 184, and FVC 184. Bolton

JPN 190. Special Studies. (1-5) Individual study, three to fifteen hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. To be taken with the consent of the Chair of the Department as a means of meeting special curricular problems in either language or literature. Course is repeatable.


KOREAN

Subject abbreviation: KOR


Foreign Language Placement Examination A placement examination is required of all freshmen entering the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences who wish to meet the foreign language requirement with the same language taken in high school. Consult the quarterly Schedule of Classes for date and time. Transfer students who have taken a college-level language course cannot take the placement examination and should consult with their advisors. No college-level credit may be duplicated.

LOWER-DIVISION COURSES

KOR 001. First-Year Korean. (4) Lecture, four hours. Prerequisite(s): none. An introduction to the sound system and grammar of Korean with emphasis on reading, writing, understanding, and speaking.

KOR 002. First-Year Korean. (4) Lecture, four hours. Prerequisite(s): KOR 001. An introduction to the sound system and grammar of Korean with emphasis on reading, writing, understanding, and speaking.

KOR 003. First-Year Korean. (4) Lecture, four hours. Prerequisite(s): KOR 002. An introduction to the sound system and grammar of Korean with emphasis on reading, writing, understanding, and speaking.

KOR 004. Second-Year Korean. (4) Lecture, four hours. Prerequisite(s): KOR 003 or equivalent or consent of instructor. Emphasizes reading, writing, grammar, and conversation.

KOR 005. Second-Year Korean. (4) Lecture, four hours. Prerequisite(s): KOR 004 or KOR 025 or consent of instructor. Emphasizes reading, writing, grammar, and conversation. Conducted primarily in Korean.

KOR 025. Conversation and Composition. (4) Lecture, four hours. Prerequisite(s): KOR 003 or equivalent. Practice at the intermediate level in speaking and writing Korean. Regular discussion and oral presentation of assigned written topics. Provides a review of basic grammar with the goal of achieving oral and written command.


CIVILIZATION

Committee in Charge
Sylvia Ochs, M.A. Germanic Studies
Wendy J. Raschke, Ph.D. Classics/Comparative Ancient Civilizations
Theda Shapiro, Ph.D. French
Nicoletta Tinozzi Mehrmand, Ph.D. Italian
Yang Ye, Ph.D. Asian Languages and Civilizations
Patricia O'Brien, Ph.D. Dean, College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences, ex officio

The Civilization concentration is available in French and Russian Studies. See specific requirements under each respective section.


LOWER-DIVISION COURSES

EUR 025. Introduction to European Culture. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite(s): none. A study of major characteristics of Western culture and the influence of Western ideas and institutions throughout the world. Emphasis on the ways in which society, economy, ideas, and technology interact to produce change. Audio-visual presentations demonstrate European forms in the arts, private life, and urban and rural environments. All work is done in English.

EUR 030 (E-Z). Themes in French Civilization. (4) Lecture, three hours; individual study, three hours. Prerequisite(s): none. Examines major aspects of French and Francophone cultures, studied through art history, history, literature, and ethnography. F. France and America; W. The Frenchwoman. No knowledge of French is necessary.

EUR 047. Introduction to Russian Culture. (4) Lecture, three hours; consultation, one hour. A multimedia introduction to Russian culture. Emphasis on Russian masterpieces in art, architecture, dance, theatre, literature, film, and music which are characteristic of the culture and life of their period. All work is done in English. Strongly recommended for Russian majors.


UPPER-DIVISION COURSES

EUR 111A. Survey of Russian Civilization. (4) Lecture, three hours; consultation, one hour. Covers pre-twentieth century Russian music, architecture, and art. Any course within the EUR 111A, EUR 111B, EUR 111C, and EUR 111D sequence may be taken independently. No knowledge of Russian is necessary.

EUR 111B. Survey of Russian Civilization. (4) Lecture, three hours; consultation, one hour. Covers Russian philosophy, religion, and science. Any course within the EUR 111A, EUR 111B, EUR 111C, and EUR 111D sequence may be taken independently. No knowledge of Russian is necessary.

EUR 111C. Survey of Russian Civilization. (4) Lecture, three hours; consultation, one hour. Covers Russian symbolism and the Great Emigration. Any course within the EUR 111A, EUR 111B, EUR 111C, and EUR 111D sequence may be taken independently. No knowledge of Russian is necessary.

EUR 111D. Survey of Russian Civilization. (4) Lecture, three hours; consultation, one hour. Covers Soviet culture. Any course within the EUR 111A, EUR 111B, EUR 111C, and EUR 111D sequence may be taken independently.No knowledge of Russian is necessary.

EUR 112A. Survey of Germanic Cultures and Institutions. (4) Lecture, three hours; outside reading, three hours. Prerequisite(s): none. Covers the humanism, baroque, and enlightenment periods to 1750. Any course within the EUR 112A, EUR 112B, and EUR 112C sequence may be taken independently. No knowledge of German is required. Gugelberger

EUR 112B. Survey of Germanic Cultures and Institutions. (4) Lecture, three hours; outside reading, three hours. Prerequisite(s): none. Covers German civilization, 1750 to 1880. Any course within the EUR 112A, EUR 112B, and EUR 112C sequence may be taken independently. No knowledge of German is required. Gugelberger

EUR 112C. Survey of Germanic Cultures and Institutions. (4) Lecture, three hours; outside reading, three hours. Prerequisite(s): none. Covers German civilization, 1880 to the present. Any course within the EUR 112A, EUR 112B, and EUR 112C sequence may be taken independently. No knowledge of German is required. Gugelberger

EUR 113 (E-Z). Special Topics in Russian Civilization. (4) Lecture, three hours; consultation, one hour. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. An in-depth study of selected topics dealing with Russian cultural phenomena, for example, medieval Russian civilization and Moscow versus St. Petersburg/ Leningrad as representatives of two opposing cultural and philosophical worlds. No knowledge of Russian is necessary. F: Russian Folklore.

EUR 114A. French Civilization: Middle Ages. (4) Lecture, three hours; extra reading, three hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Interdisciplinary study of major aspects of French culture. Each course in the EUR 114A, EUR 114B, and EUR 114C sequence may be taken independently of the others. No knowledge of French is necessary. Shapiro

EUR 114B. French Civilization: Renaissance and Ancien Régime. (4) Lecture, three hours; extra reading, three hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Interdisciplinary study of major aspects of French culture. Each course in the EUR 114A, EUR 114B, and EUR 114C sequence may be taken independently of the others. No knowledge of French is necessary. Shapiro

EUR 114C. French Civilization: French Revolution to the Belle Epoque. (4) Lecture, three hours; extra reading, three hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Interdisciplinary study of major aspects of French culture. Each course in the EUR 114A, EUR 114B, and EUR 114C sequence may be taken independently of the others. No knowledge of French is necessary. Shapiro

EUR 115 (E-Z). French Studies. (4) Lecture, three hours; term paper, three hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Varying topics relating to the literature, thought, and culture of France. Possible topics might include: the Paris mystique, French literary existentialism, individualism in the Renaissance. F: Paris; M: Medieval Women in France. No knowledge of French is necessary.

EUR 116A. Modern and Contemporary France: 1914-1958. (4) Lecture, three hours; extra reading, three hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Interdisciplinary study of French society, culture, politics, and institutions. EUR 116A and EUR 116B may be taken independently of each other. No knowledge of French is necessary. Shapiro

EUR 116B. Modern and Contemporary France: 1958 to the Present. (4) Lecture, three hours; extra reading, three hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Interdisciplinary study of French society, culture, politics, and institutions. EUR 116A and EUR 116B may be taken independently of each other. No knowledge of French is necessary. Shapiro

LNST 118A. Survey of Latin American Culture and Civilization: Pre-Columbian Period to Independence. (4) Lecture, three hours; read and consult, one hour. Covers the pre-Columbian period to independence. No knowledge of Spanish is necessary. Credit is awarded for only one of the LNST 118A and LNST 118B sequence or SPN 102B.

LNST 118B. Survey of Latin American Culture and Civilization: Modern Period. (4) Lecture, three hours; read and consult, one hour. Covers the modern period. No knowledge of Spanish is necessary. Credit is awarded for only one of the LNST 118A and LNST 118B sequence or SPN 102B.

EUR 119 (E-Z). Topics in Italian Culture. (4) Lecture, three hours; extra reading, three hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. In-depth study of major topics in Italian institutions, society, and culture. E. Contemporary Italy; M. Making of Italian Arts; R. Risorgimento: Birth of the Italian Nation; U. Italian Urban Culture. No knowledge of Italian is required.

EUR 124. Nordic Mythology, Folklore, and Fairytales. (4) Seminar, three hours; extra reading, one hour; written work, two hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Introduces the representation of animals, plants, and other appearances of the natural world such as sunrise and sunset in European creation and destruction mythology, fairytales, and folklore. Cross-listed with GER 124.

EUR 191. Seminar in European Civilization. (4) Seminar, three hours; consultation, one hour. Discussion and research on a selected theme related to European civilizations. Advanced methodological training and comparative approaches will be emphasized. Topics may include: urban and/or rural life, the family, women, education, cultural creativity. Course may be repeated for credit up to 12 units.

CLASSICAL STUDIES

Committee in Charge
David Glidden, Ph.D. (Philosophy)
Robert B. Griffin, Ph.D. Comparative Literature and French
Benjamin King, Ph.D. Classics
Wendy J. Raschke, Ph.D. Classics/Comparative Ancient Civilizations
Thomas F. Scanlon, Ph.D. Classics and Comparative Ancient Civilizations
Patricia O'Brien, Ph.D. Dean, College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences, ex officio

The objective of the B.A. in Classical Studies is the furthering of knowledge of classical civilization through two emphases: the study of Greek and/or Latin language(s) and literature(s) and the study of courses in English translation on topics including classical literature, history, politics, religion, mythology, and art in order to aid students' appreciation of the Greek and Roman contributions to later Western civilization.

The student who majors in Classical Studies acquires a balanced yet focused view of the language, literature, thought, and civilization of Greece and Rome. The student also obtains the valuable skills of a better vocabulary, a sharper critical sense, logical analysis of texts, coherent argumentation, and a valuable perspective on our own society. Classical Studies majors receive a liberal arts education of traditional excellence and one widely esteemed by business and professional schools. A student may also pursue graduate training in Classics, Art History, History, Philosophy, or other related disciplines.

MAJOR

Language Proficiency All students in Classical Studies must complete either LATN 001, LATN 002, LATN 003, and LATN 004 (or equivalents) or GRK 001, GRK 002, and GRK 003 (or equivalents). They must also complete 12 upper-division units (or the equivalent) of course work in Latin or Greek.

  1. Language proficiency requirement:
  1. Civilization requirement  
    Either two courses from CLA 010A, CLA 010B, CLA 010C or both CLA 027A and CLA 027B
  2. WRLT 015
  3. Twenty-four (24) units from the following:

Related lower-division courses which are highly recommended are as follows: CLA 022 (Greek and Roman Athletics); CLA 040 (Classical Mythology). In their course selection, students should seek exposure to both the Greek and Roman components of the major.

Foreign Language Placement Examination A placement examination is required of all freshmen entering the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences who wish to meet the foreign language requirement with the same language taken in high school. Consult the quarterly Schedule of Classes for date and time. Transfer students who have taken a college-level language course cannot take the placement examination and should consult with their advisors. No college-level credit may be duplicated.

Minor

The Classical Studies minor offers students a fundamental understanding of classical language and culture which form the basis of much of western civilization. The minor naturally complements liberal arts degrees in many areas, including History, Art History, Philosophy, English, and Religious Studies. Students profit from the skills associated with a degree in the classics, such as enhancement of analytical and critical abilities, communication skills, and verbal proficiency.

  1. One course from CLA 010A, CLA 010B, CLA 010C, CLA 027A, or CLA 027B
  2. Either LATN 001, LATN 002, LATN 003, and LATN 004 (or equivalents) or GRK 001, GRK 002, and GRK 003 (or equivalents)
  3. One upper-division course (4 units) in either Latin or Greek
  4. Three courses from among the following (12 units)

See Minors under the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences in the Undergraduate Studies section of this catalog for additional information on minors.


CLASSICS

Subject abbreviation: CLA


LOWER-DIVISION COURSES

CLA 010A. Ancient Civilization: Early Greece and the Mediterranean. (4) Lecture, three hours; term paper, three hours. Prerequisite(s): none. A broad treatment of history, art and archaeology, and literature, read in translation, comprising a cultural survey of the origins and the first formation of Western civilization. Raschke

CLA 010B. Ancient Civilization: Classical Greece. (4) Lecture, three hours; term paper, three hours. Prerequisite(s): none. A broad treatment of history, art and archaeology, and literature, read in translation, comprising a cultural survey of the origins and the first formation of Western civilization. Raschke

CLA 010C. Ancient Civilization: Rome. (4) Lecture, three hours; term paper, three hours. Prerequisite(s): none. A broad treatment of history, art and archaeology, and literature, read in translation, comprising a cultural survey of the origins and the first formation of Western civilization. Raschke

CLA 017. Rome: The Ancient City. (4) Lecture, three hours; extra reading, three hours. Traces the development of the city of ancient Rome. By studying the literary and historical evidence alongside the physical remains of the city--its monuments, art, and historical and archaeological remains--this course seeks to introduce students to the Romans and to their importance for later ages. Cross-listed with AHS 030 and HIST 027.

CLA 020. Word Power from Greek and Latin Roots. (4) Lecture, three hours; consultation, one hour. An intensive study of Greek and Latin elements in English etymology and word derivation. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is necessary. King, Scanlon

CLA 022. Greek and Roman Athletics. (4) Lecture, three hours; consultation, one hour. A study of ancient Greek and Roman athletics and their connections with religion, politics, literature, and art. Primary sources read in translation. Scanlon

CLA 027A. Classical Literature in Translation: Love and Death. (4) Lecture, three hours; consultation, one hour. Selected readings in Greco-Roman epic, drama, lyric, history, and philosophy.

CLA 027B. Classical Literature in Translation: Illusion and Reality. (4) Lecture, three hours; consultation, one hour. Selected readings in Greco-Roman epic, drama, lyric, history, and philosophy.

CLA 030. Scientific Word Power from Latin and Greek Roots. (4) Lecture, three hours; extra reading, three hours. Prerequisite(s): none. A systematic analysis of the scientific terminology in English derived from Greek and Latin stems, including those in the biological and natural sciences. Aims are to teach word-analysis, to increase technical and taxonomic vocabulary, and to study our linguistic and cultural debt to Greek and Roman scientific language. King

CLA 040. Classical Mythology. (4) Lecture, three hours; term paper, three hours. Prerequisite(s): none. An introductory survey of the mythology of Greece and Rome, including the divine myths, heroic legends, and the implications of these polytheistic systems for ancient culture. King, Scanlon

CLA 100. Ancient Historians. (4) Lecture, three hours; outside research, two hours; term paper, one hour. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. The historical development of historiography as evidenced in ancient historical writings from Near Eastern king lists and biblical histories to the narrative histories of Greece and Rome. Focuses on the ideas of history in the various cultures of the ancient Near East and Mediterranean and their relation to modern historical thought. Cross-listed with HISE 110.

CLA 110 (E-Z). Latin Literary Genres. (4) Lecture, three hours; term paper, three hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Readings and discussion of the principal genres of Classical Latin Literature. Attention is given to contemporary ancient critical theory, and its divergence from modern literary constructs. Includes analysis of primary ancient texts and modern scholarship. This course may meet certain college or major language requirements for those students who choose, with instructor's permission, to do select readings in Latin. E. Drama; J. Historical Literature. Cross-listed with LATN 110 (E-Z). Raschke, Scanlon

CLA 112. Mythology. (4) Lecture, three hours; extra reading, three hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. A comparative study of mythic traditions from several world cultures and religions viewed from a variety of theoretical perspectives. Includes material drawn from epics, religious texts, divine hymns, creation myths, heroic legends, and concepts of the afterlife as reflected in literary and nonliterary sources. Cross-listed with RLST 117 and WRLT 112.

CLA 114. The Classical Tradition. (4) Lecture, three hours; extra reading, three hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. A survey of the legacy of Greece and Rome in Western Culture, from the Renaissance to the present. Topics include literature, art, architecture, and politics. Cross-listed with WRLT 114. King, Scanlon

CLA 120 (E-Z). Themes and Issues of the Classical World. (4) Lecture, three hours; individual study, three hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Focuses on an aspect of antiquity of critical importance to modern culture, and examines the relevant literary texts, artistic monuments, and cultural data. Students explore and interpret ancient sources to gain an appreciation of the differences and similarities between the classical world and the world today. All readings are in English; no knowledge of foreign languages is required. E. Ancient Sexuality and Gender: Myths and Realities; F. Greco-Roman Popular Culture. G. Reading Greek and Roman Sports.

CLA 165. Greco-Roman Cults and Credence. (4) Lecture, three hours; term paper, three hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Survey of the rich diversity of religious belief and systems of worship in the Greco-Roman world, from Bronze Age and Classical Greeks, to the Romans of the late Empire. Texts, documents, and archaeological evidence are examined to explore these unique constructions of ritual and creed. Scanlon

CLA 190. Special Studies. (1-5) To be taken with the consent of the chairman of the department as a means of meeting special curricular problems or deficiencies. Course is repeatable.


GRADUATE COURSES

See also UC Tri-Campus Graduate Program in Classics.

CPLT 213. Rhetoric and Argument in Ancient China and Greece. (4) Seminar, three hours; outside research, three hours. Prerequisite(s): graduate standing or consent of instructor. A study of theories and practices of rhetoric, argument, persuasion, and, in some cases, poetics in ancient China and Greece (texts dating from the fifth to the third centuries B.C.), as well as some of their implications for contemporary theory and practice. Students who submit a seminar paper receive a letter grade; other students receive a Satisfactory (S) or No Credit (NC) grade. This course may also be taken on a Satisfactory (S) or No Credit (NC) basis by students advanced to candidacy for the Ph.D. Cross-listed with POSC 213.

CPLT 290H, CPLT 290L. Directed Studies. (1-6, 1-6) Description under Comparative Literature. 290H: Greek; 290L: Latin.


PROFESSIONAL COURSE

CLA 302. Teaching Practicum. (1-4) Practicum, four to eight hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite(s): LTLG 301 or equivalent; graduate standing; employment as teaching assistant or associate-in. Supervised teaching in lower-division courses. Required of all teaching assistants in Classics. Graded Satisfactory (S) or No Credit (NC). Course is repeatable.


GREEK

Subject abbreviation: GRK


Foreign Language Placement Examination A placement examination is required of all freshmen entering the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences who wish to meet the foreign language requirement with the same language taken in high school. Consult the quarterly Schedule of Classes for date and time. Transfer students who have taken a college-level language course cannot take the placement examination and should consult with their advisors. No college-level credit may be duplicated.


LOWER-DIVISION COURSES

GRK 001. Introduction to Classical Greek. (4) Lecture, four hours. Prerequisite(s): none. Intensive study of the fundamentals of Attic Greek with practice in reading and writing. King

GRK 002. Introduction to Classical Greek. (4) Lecture, four hours. Prerequisite(s): GRK 001. Intensive study of the fundamentals of Attic Greek with practice in reading and writing. King

GRK 003. Introduction to Classical Greek. (4) Lecture, four hours. Prerequisite(s): GRK 002. Intensive study of the fundamentals of Attic Greek with practice in reading and writing. King


UPPER-DIVISION COURSES

GRK 101. Advanced Greek Reading and Grammar. (4) Lecture, three hours; extra reading, three hours. Prerequisite(s): GRK 003 or equivalent. One or two of the following will be offered every year, according to need. E: Homer Iliad, F: Homer Odyssey, G: Lyric Poets, H: Aeschylus, I: Sophocles, J: Euripides, K: Aristophanes, L: Herodotus, M: Thucydides, N: Xenophon, O: The Attic Orators, P: Plato, Q: Aristotle, R: New Testament, T: Hellenistic and Later Greek.

GRK 190. Special Studies. (1-5) To be taken with the consent of the instructor as a means of meeting special curricular problems. Course is repeatable.


GRADUATE COURSES

See also UC Tri-Campus Graduate Program in Classics.

CPLT 290H. Directed Studies. (1-6) Description under Comparative Literature. 290H: Greek.

GRK 292. Concurrent Analytical Studies. (2) Research, six hours. Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor; concurrent enrollment in GRK 100-series course. To be taken on an individual basis. Each student completes a graduate paper based on research related to the GRK 100-series course. Course is repeatable.


PROFESSIONAL COURSE

LTLG 301. Teaching of Foreign Language at the College Level. (4) Description under Literature and Languages.


LATIN

Subject abbreviation: LATN


Foreign Language Placement Examination A placement examination is required of all freshmen entering the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences who wish to meet the foreign language requirement with the same language taken in high school. Consult the quarterly Schedule of Classes for date and time. Transfer students who have taken a college-level language course cannot take the placement examination and should consult with their advisors. No college-level credit may be duplicated.


LOWER-DIVISION COURSES

LATN 001. Introduction to Latin. (4) Lecture, four hours. Prerequisite(s): none. Intensive study of the fundamentals of the Latin language with practice in reading and writing.

LATN 002. Introduction to Latin. (4) Lecture, four hours. Prerequisite(s): LATN 001. Intensive study of the fundamentals of the Latin language with practice in reading and writing.

LATN 003. Introduction to Latin. (4) Lecture, four hours. Prerequisite(s): LATN 002. Intensive study of the fundamentals of the Latin language with practice in reading and writing.

LATN 004. Intermediate Latin. (4) Lecture, three hours; three weekly grammar study projects. Prerequisite(s): LATN 003 or equivalent. Readings from Latin prose and poetry, accompanied by selective review of grammar and presentation of more advanced grammatical issues. Designed to complete the introductory sequence and to ease the transition to upper-division literature courses. Raschke


UPPER-DIVISION COURSES

LATN 101 (E-Z). Advanced Latin Reading and Grammar. (4) Lecture, three hours; extra reading, three hours. Prerequisite(s): LATN 004 or equivalent. One or two of the following are offered every year according to need. E. Plautus; F. Terence; G. Virgil; H. Catullus; I. Horace; J. Ovid; K. Propertius; L. Tibullus; M. Sallust; N. Cicero; O. Livy; P. Tacitus; Q. Juvenal; R. Lucretius; S. Seneca; T. Pliny; U. Medieval Latin; V. Renaissance Latin.

LATN 110 (E-Z). Latin Literary Genres. (4) Lecture, three hours; term paper, three hours. Prerequisite(s): upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Readings and discussions of the principal genres of Classical Latin literature. Attention is given to contemporary ancient critical theory, and its divergence from modern literary constructs. Includes analysis of primary ancient texts and modern scholarship. This course may meet certain college or major language requirements for those students who choose with instructor's permission to do select readings in Latin. E. Drama; J. Historical Literature. Cross-listed with CLA 110 (E-Z).

LATN 135. The Roman Novel. (4) Lecture, three hours; extra reading, three hours. Prerequisite(s): LATN 004 or equivalent. Reading and discussion of Latin prose fiction as represented by Petronius' Satyricon and/or Apuleius' Metamorphoses. Emphasis given to the development of the romantic novel in Latin. Raschke

LATN 190. Special Studies. (1-5) Individual study, three to fifteen hours. Prerequisite(s): LATN 004 or equivalent or consent of instructor. To be taken as a means of meeting special curricular problems. Course is repeatable. Scanlon


GRADUATE COURSES

See also UC Tri-Campus Graduate Program in Classics.

CPLT 290L. Directed Studies. (1-6) Description under Comparative Literature. 290L: Latin.

LATN 292. Concurrent Analytical Studies. (2) Research, six hours. Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor; concurrent enrollment in LATN 100-series course. To be taken on an individual basis. Student will complete a graduate paper based on research related to the LATN 100-series course. Course is repeatable with different topic.


PROFESSIONAL COURSE

LTLG 301. Teaching of Foreign Language at the College Level. (4) Description under Literature and Languages.


THE UC TRI-CAMPUS GRADUATE PROGRAM IN CLASSICS

http://www.humanities.uci.edu/classics/Tricampus

(UC Irvine, UC Riverside, and UC San Diego)

The University of California Tri-Campus Graduate Program in Classics is a joint venture that combines faculty in Classics and related disciplines from the three southernmost University of California campuses.

Students accepted into the program may enroll at any of the three campuses, but they normally apply for admission to the Tri-Campus program through UC Irvine, which is the main location for instruction and administration. Applications to the Tri-Campus program are reviewed by an admissions committee composed of faculty members from all three campuses.

The goal of the program is to provide a graduate education that unites the main currents of modern literary, cultural, and social-scientific theory with the traditional skills and methodologies of classical philology. Candidates for degrees are expected to exhibit facility in Greek and Latin, competence in research, including theoretical approaches to texts and objects, technical mastery of computing for research and teaching, and experience in teaching.

These goals are realized through the four core courses (CLA 200A, CLA 200B, CLA 200C, and CLA 201), seminars (UC Riverside CLA 250/ UC Irvine CLASSIC 220) and reading courses (UC Riverside CLA 292/UC Irvine CLASSIC 205).

All students are admitted into the Ph.D. program. With the exception of those granted advanced standing because they hold the M.A. degree in Classics from another institution, entering students are concurrently enrolled in the M.A. program.

Master's Degree

The requirements for the M.A. degree in Classics are two years (six quarters) of course work, passage of a special set of examinations, and completion of a master's paper. The expected time for completion of the M.A. degree is two years. The normal course load is three 200-level courses each quarter. Minimum course requirements are four quarters of CLA 200A, CLA 200B, CLA 200C, and CLA 201; four quarters of UC Riverside CLA 292/UC Irvine CLASSIC 205; and four quarters of UC Riverside CLA 250/UC Irvine CLASSIC 220. (UC Riverside CLA 290/UC Irvine CLASSIC 280 may be substituted for these courses at the discretion of the faculty.) A reading knowledge of either Germanic Studies, French, Italian, or equivalent language, demonstrated by examination or other means, is a also a requirement.

Doctoral Degree

The requirements for the Ph.D. degree in Classics are three years (nine quarters) of course work. Minimum course requirements are four quarters of CLA 200A, CLA 200B, CLA 200C, and CLA 201; five quarters of UC Riverside CLA 292/ UC Irvine CLASSIC 205; and six quarters of UC Riverside CLA 250/UC Irvine CLASSIC 220 or an equivalent course. (UC Riverside CLA 290/ UC Irvine CLASSIC 280 may be substituted for these courses at the discretion of the Program faculty.) Students are encouraged to take courses and seminars in relevant areas outside the program at any of the three campuses.

Students must demonstrate reading proficiency in a second modern language by the end of the third year. At this stage, and during the fourth year of study, students are expected to have read extensively in the primary texts and in literary history and theory and in ancient history. In addition, experience in supervised teaching and/or research activity is normally required. To qualify as a candidate for the Ph.D. and enter the dissertation stage, a student must pass an individually designed set of qualifying examinations, including translation examinations in Greek and Latin, written examinations or lengthy papers in special authors and field, and an oral examination. The expected time for the completion of the Ph.D. is six years.

The facilities, course offerings, programs, and individual faculty mentorship of all three campuses are available to students in the Tri-Campus degree program. The resources of the program are enhanced through a cooperative teaching arrangement among the Tri-Campus program and the Classics graduate programs of UC Los Angeles and the University of Southern California.

Faculty
Thomas F. Scanlon, Ph.D. Professor of Classics, and Program Director, UCR Greek and Roman Historiography, Ancient Athletics
Georgios Anagnostopoulos, Ph.D. Professor of Philosophy, UCSD Ancient Greek Philosophy, Ethics, Metaphysics
Luci Berkowitz, Ph.D. Professor Emerita of Classics, UCI Greek Literary History, Computer Application to Literature
Theodore F. Brunner, Ph.D. Professor Emeritus of Classics, UCI Computer Application to Classical Literature
Charles Chamberlain, Ph.D. Lecturer in Classics and Comparative Literature, UCSD Greek and Latin Literature, Aristotle, Poetics
Cynthia L. Claxton, Ph.D. Lecturer in Classics, and graduate teaching supervisor, UCI Greek prose, Historiography
Walter Donlan, Ph.D. Professor of Classics, graduate advisor, UCI Early Greek literature, Greek Social History
Page duBois, Ph.D. Professor of Classics and Comparative Literature, UCSD Greek Literature, Rhetoric, Critical Theory, Cultural Studies
Anthony Edwards, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Classics and Comparative Literature, UCSD Epic, Greek Comedy, Critical Theory
Leslie Collins Edwards, Ph.D. Lecturer in Classics and Comparative Literature, UCSD Homer, Greek Drama, Education in Ancient Greece
Richard I. Frank, Ph.D. Associate Professor of History and Classics, UCI Roman history, Latin Elegy and Satire, Classical Tradition
David Glidden, Ph.D. Professor of Philosophy, UCR Greek and Roman Philosophy
Anna Gonosová, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Art History, UCI Byzantine and Medieval Art
Benjamin King, Ph.D. Lecturer in Classics, UCR Greek Literature and Philosophy
Edward N. Lee, Ph.D. Professor Emeritus of Philosophy, UCSD Greek Philosophy, Plato
Marianne McDonald, Ph.D. Professor of Theatre and Classics, UCSD
Greek and Roman Theatre, Ancient Drama in Modern Plays, Film, and Opera
Margaret M. Miles, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Art History, UCI Greek and Roman Art and Archaeology, Ancient Sicily, Greek Religion
Alden A. Mosshammer, Ph.D. Professor of History, UCSD Early Christian Thought, Greek Chronography, Early Greek History
Sheldon Nodelman, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Visual Arts, UCSD Classical Art and Architecture, Roman Portraiture, Critical Theory
Maria C. Pantelia, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Classics, and Director, Thesaurus Linguae Graecae, UCI Greek Epic Poetry, Hellenistic Poetry, Computer Applications to Classics
Wendy Raschke, Ph.D. Lecturer in Classics, UCR Roman Satire, Greek Art and Archaeology
B. P. Reardon, D.U. Professor Emeritus of Classics, UCI Late Greek Literature, Ancient Novel
Michele Salzman, Ph.D. Professor of History, UCR Late Antiquity; Roman History and Literature, Religion, Women's Studies
Gerasimos Santas, Ph.D. Professor of Philosophy, UCI Ancient Philosophy, History of Philosophy, Ethics
Gary Shiffman, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Political Science, UCSD Greek Political Theory
Patrick Sinclair, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Classics, UCI Roman Historiography, Latin Lexicography, Rhetoric
Dana F. Sutton, Ph.D. Professor of Classics, UCI Greek and Latin drama, Greek poetry, Anglo-Latin Literature
Eliot Wirshbo, Ph.D. Lecturer in Classics and Comparative Literature, UCSD Greek Epic, Folklore


GRADUATE COURSES

Most of the following courses are taught at the UC Irvine campus.

See also CLA 302 under the Classics section.

CLA 200A. Contemporary Literary Theory and the Classics. (4) Lecture, three hours; individual study, three hours. Prerequisite(s): admission to the UC Tri-Campus Graduate Program in Classics or consent of instructor. An introduction to contemporary literary theory focusing on important critical approaches. Topics vary from year to year. Requires written work that explores theoretical issues and involves engagement with a Greek or Latin text. This work may, for example, illuminate some aspect of a theorist's work, put two theorists into dialogue, or explore the usefulness of a particular approach to texts, authors, or genres. Taught at UC Irvine. Same as UC Irvine CLASSIC 200A. Course is repeatable.

CLA 200B. Diachronic Perspectives on Classical Antiquity. (4) Lecture, three hours; individual study, three hours. Prerequisite(s): admission to the UC Tri-Campus Graduate Program in Classics or consent of instructor. Examines ways in which classical texts and ideas have been received and appropriated for the diverse purposes of ancient and subsequent cultures. Taught at UC Irvine. Same as UC Irvine CLASSIC 200B. Course is repeatable.

CLA 200C. Greece and Rome in Their Contemporary Cultural Contexts. (4) Lecture, three hours; individual study, three hours. Prerequisite(s): admission to the UC Tri-Campus Graduate Program in Classics or consent of instructor. An introduction to the methods and perspectives of social scientific theory used to study the material and social dimensions of the ancient cultures of Greece and Rome. Taught at UC Irvine. Same as UC Irvine CLASSIC 200C. Course is repeatable.

CLA 201. Computing in Classical Studies. (4) Lecture, three hours; individual study, three hours. Prerequisite(s): admission to the UC Tri-Campus Graduate Program in Classics or consent of instructor. An introduction to the latest methods of computing for research and teaching. Taught at UC Irvine. Same as UC Irvine CLASSIC 201. Course is repeatable.

CLA 250. Seminar in Classics (4) Seminar, three hours; individual study, three hours. Prerequisite(s): admission to the UC Tri-Campus Graduate Program in Classics or consent of instructor. Focuses mainly, but not exclusively, on major literary topics. Subject matter varies. Taught at UC Irvine. Same as UC Irvine CLASSIC 220. Course is repeatable.

CLA 290. Directed Studies. (1-6) Outside research, three to eighteen hours. Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor and graduate advisor; normally open only to students in the UC Tri-Campus Graduate Program in Classics. Supervised independent research. Same as UC Irvine CLASSIC 280. Graded Satisfactory (S) or No Credit (NC). Course is repeatable.

CLA 292. Concurrent Studies in Classics. (2) Individual study, six hours. Prerequisite(s): admission to the UC Tri-Campus Graduate Program in Classics or consent of instructor. Concurrent enrollment in an advanced undergraduate Greek or Latin course, with credit awarded for additional reading and separate examinations. Same as UC Irvine CLASSIC 205. Course is repeatable.

CLA 297. Directed Research. (1-6) Outside research, three to eighteen hours. Prerequisite(s): admission to the UC Tri-Campus Graduate Program in Classics or consent of instructor. Research in preparation for the Candidacy Examination. Same as UC Irvine CLASSIC 290. Graded Satisfactory (S) or No Credit (NC). Course is repeatable.

CLA 299. Research for the Thesis or Dissertation. (1-12) Outside research, three to thirty-six hours. Prerequisite(s): admission to the UC Tri-Campus Graduate Program in Classics or consent of instructor. Directed research for the M.A. thesis or Ph.D. dissertation. Same as UC Irvine CLASSIC 299. Graded Satisfactory (S) or No Credit (NC). Course is repeatable.